Write your memoir with me at The IWC!

Write your Memoir – Irish Writers’ Centre, Autumn 2017

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Creative Non-Fiction @ the Irish Writers’ Centre, Spring 2017.

Creative non-fiction is a true story, well told. The key is learning how to persuade readers that what interests you should also interest them. Using field notes and exercises, you will explore the ideas that underpin the desire to write, focus on the skills needed to bring the text alive, and discuss what publishing opportunities exist for your work. Participants will share and discuss their own works-in-progress, and will be encouraged to try out fresh approaches during the course.

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Little Magazines: Literary Periodicals 1950 – 1970

Here’s a rare design perspective on the history of Ireland’s “little magazines” by Niall McCormack, designer of gorse.

Hitone: Vintage Irish Book Covers

TheBell-Dec1950

The Bell, Vol. XVI No. 3, December 1950. Design: uncredited

icarus-No17-1955-PaulineBewickIcarus, Vol. 5 No. 17, November 1955. Design: Pauline Bewick

KilkennyMagazine-Issue2-Autunm1960-ChristopherFayThe Kilkenny Magazine, No. 2, Autumn 1960. Design: Christopher Fay

Dolmen-PoetryIreland-1962-Issue1-unknownPoetry Ireland, No. 1, Autumn 1962. Design: uncredited (Ruth Brandt)

Threshold-No23-Summer1970-ColinMiddletonThreshold, No. 23, Summer 1970. Design: Colin Middleton

Literary magazines held a special place in the cultural life of mid-century Ireland. Although print-runs were low, their impact was disproportionate and they managed to reflect a more varied and complex Ireland then the mainstream media. The five examples above all follow a set format – octavo in size, each has a mono interior with a 2-colour cover on heavy uncoated card.

The Bell is the best know of the magazines here. The first issue appeared in 1940 under the editorship of Seán Ó Faoláin. It managed to continue publication throughout the ’40s, challenging the then dominant…

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Salon Nights at DLR Lexicon, 2015

In the literary world, news breaks first through the ‘little magazine.’ It’s where writers turn professional, coached by the editors into perfecting their skills. And Ireland’s independent journals continue to thrive in the fast changing world of literary publishing.

Salon Night at the Studio is a brand new monthly series for writers and readers, focused on the world of Ireland’s ‘little magazines’, held in The Studio at dlr Lexicon. Selina Guinness, dlr County Council writer-in-residence, will be your host for the night.

Salon Nights Programme 2015

Talking to my Father – Film Review

For Pale Project members whose work explores Sandycove and Dalkey, here’s a film about some of the area’s most iconic Modernist architecture

No More Workhorse

Talking

Talking to my Father– Film Review by Emily Elphinstone

Director: Sé Merry Doyle

Standing on a bicycle, peering over the wall into what used to be his family home, hidden away in the centre of Dublin, we meet Simon Walker; the narrator and guide of ‘Talking to My Father.’

Written by Walker himself, and directed by Sé Merry Doyle; ‘Talking to My Father’ traces the life and work of his father, Architect Robin Walker. Robin Walker worked under icons of modern architecture Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe; before revolutionising Ireland’s Architecture in the 1960s as part of firm Scott Tallon Walker.

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The Pale Project at Culture Night at dlrLexIcon

There’s a fantastic line-up of events tonight at dlr LexIcon: an inflatable cinema showing new animation, light shows, sound shows and music and lots going on at the Pavilion too.  I’ll be in the LexIcon cafe if anyone wants to drop by to find out more about The Pale Project, Salon Nights at the Studio, and the workshops I’m running. Please come and say hello. To find out more:  The Pale Project

The Pale Project presents Salon Nights at the Studio, dlr Lexicon

        gorseno4

Salon Night at the dlr Lexicon Studio

In the literary world, news breaks first through the ‘little magazine.’ It’s where writers turn professional, coached by the editors into perfecting their skills. And Ireland’s independent journals continue to thrive in the fast changing world of literary publishing.

Salon Night at the Studio is a brand new monthly series for writers and readers, focused on the world of Ireland’s ‘little magazines’, held in The Studio at dlr Lexicon. Selina Guinness, dlr County Council writer-in-residence, will be your host for the night.

At the Salon, top editors will outline their ambitions, and introduce the writers they have selected to represent their magazine. Selina will invite guests to discuss what excites them about the current literary scene. Salon Nights offer a mix of interview, banter, short readings and discussion, providing a taste of the freshest literary talents, alongside insights into how writers are formed.

This will be a free but ticketed event. Tickets available through Eventbrite from 14th September 2015.

Salon Nights:

Weds 7th October, 8 pmThe Dublin Review with Brendan Barrington.

Readers: Mark O’Connell and Sally Rooney.

Weds 4th November, 8 pmGorse with Susan Tomaselli.

Readers: Clare-Louise Bennett and Joanna Walsh

Weds 2nd December, 8 pm: The Stinging Fly with Declan Meade and Thomas Morris.

Readers: Danielle McLaughlin and Cathy Sweeney

Night owls are invited to move with the salon to a local venue TBC after the event

Applications now open for The Pale Project Workshops at DLR Lexicon

The Pale Project with dlr Writer in Residence Selina Guinness

What is “The Pale Project”?

We all know where we live but we don’t always get the chance to consider what it means to inhabit a place or how it might shape our daily lives, habits, our dreams. “The Pale Project” aims to do just that. In a series of dedicated workshops, lectures and public events, this year’s residency will focus on dwelling and thinking in Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown.

Who is it for?

“The Pale Project” is open to all curious thinkers and writers: young and old; temporary, new and established residents, the able-bodied and able-minded, and those who feel less so. Together, we’ll undertake a fresh approach to writing by becoming active explorers of our everyday lives.

Why call it “The Pale Project”?

The Pale” describes the area around Dublin controlled by English colonists in the fifteenth century. It is still a loaded term, describing a place where civilised behaviour, property rights and the political might to enforce them, all coincide. The phrase, ‘beyond the Pale’ also carries a charge, describing lawless behaviour, wild territories, and a way of living supposedly beyond the reckoning of “civilised minds”.

A map of 1488 shows the Pale boundary beginning at Bulloch Harbour and running in to Mount Merrion, before turning in to Dundrum, and on across the hills to Tallaght. This line through the county, tracking from the sea to the mountains, will provide our starting point for thinking about what makes us feel settled and unsettled, what makes us feel secure, or excluded or estranged in a place.

What will we do?

The writer-in-residence invites applications from writers, artists, historians, walkers, readers and idlers to two exciting series of workshops, starting on 30th September 2015.

It is expected that participants will commit to both series of workshops.

Series 1: The Pale Project – Field Notes.  September – November 2015.

Participants will nominate their own individual dlr territory to act as their ‘Pale’. This could be a park or an estate, an institution or a set of streets, a mountain, a few fields, a pier or a bathing place. It doesn’t have to be where you live. What’s important is that you enjoy documenting the way life is lived and dreamed there in stories, images, eccentric maps, songs, walks, catalogue entries, byelaws, and good conversations.

Each participant will create their own scrapbook of field-notes about their territory by completing small weekly tasks. These might include mapping items of interest in your territory, recording an interview with a resident, researching a notable death and writing up a charter for new citizens of the territory. The aim is to play with documentary methods to open up new perspectives on everyday life.

Each week, participating explorers will share their discoveries about their Pale and we will explore some of the key questions and ideas opened up by the project.

Series 2: The Pale Project – New Writing.  January – March 2016.

This series of workshops will focus on showing you different ways to use your discoveries about place to write creatively. Armed with your field-notes, you may choose to write in whatever form, and from whatever perspective, suits you best: essays, articles, poetry, plays, scripts, fiction of all kinds, documentary, memoir, diaries – anything so long as words are your primary tool. Collaborations too, are encouraged, across art forms and among participants.

Each week, we’ll be focused on bringing your own words to life with supportive discussion, recommended readings, and exercises in storytelling. Writing the first draft may be an individual challenge, but few books you read are the product of just one pen!

Workshops: When and Where?

When: Wednesdays, 6 pm – 7.30 pm.

Venue: Meeting Room – DLR Lexicon.

Dates: Series 1: 30th September 2015 – 25th November 2015. [No workshop 28th October]

Series 2: 20th January 2016 – 9th March 2016. [No workshop 17th February]

Selection Criteria:

The Pale Project is a collective psychogeography project aimed at mapping a diverse range of locales and experiences across Dun Laoghaire / Rathdown county in 2015 – 2016. It is open to anyone, over the age of eighteen, who wishes to take part. Participants will be selected to provide as diverse a group, and as diverse a geographical spread, as possible to achieve this aim. The Pale Project would particularly like to encourage new residents in the county, and those settled here temporarily, to apply.

Evidence of open-mindedness, creative ambition, and an interest in new ideas and approaches is more important than prior writing experience, though clear expression in English and the ability to stick to guidelines are desirable.

Applicants who have not availed of the dlr Writer-in-Residence programme in the past will be prioritized.

The writer-in-residence and a member of the dlr Arts Office will assess all applications. This decision is final.

Workshops: How To Apply?

Please email The Pale Project at dlrcocowriter@gmail.com, and clearly include the details below in an attached Word document, labelled “The Pale Project – [your name]”.

Paper Applications can be submitted to The Arts Office, dlr Lexicon, marked ‘Attn. Selina Guinness: The Pale Project – Workshops’

Deadline for Receipt of Applications: 4pm, Monday 21st September.

Application Details Required (Answers please in a Word document, labelled ‘The Pale Project – (your name here)’)

  • Your Name:
  • Date of Birth:
  • Address / Contact Details:
  • Tel / Mobile:
  • Email:

Please answer the following questions:

  1. Where would you like to nominate as your chosen Pale? This territory must be within the county of Dun Laoghaire / Rathdown. It should be no bigger an area than you can comfortably track on a walk. (max. 300 words).
  2. Describe why you would like to choose this territory as your ‘Pale’ (max 300 words).
  3. Please outline what attracts you to participating in this project, and what it might mean to you at this stage in your life. (max. 300 words).
  4. If you already engage in a creative practice (writing / arts / crafts / music etc), please describe briefly what you do. (max 300 words). There is no need to include samples of your work.
  5. Have you participated in a previous programme run by the dlr Writer-in-Residence scheme?  If so, please give details of the year and facilitator.

All queries should be addressed to Selina Guinness at dlrcocowriter@gmail.com.

Fill out the attached application form, save it as “Pale Project (add your name)” and return it by attached Word document to dlrcocowriter@gmail.com.

Paper Applications can be submitted to The Arts Office, dlr Lexicon, marked ‘Attn. Selina Guinness: The Pale Project – Workshops’

Deadline for Receipt of Applications: 4pm, Monday 21st September.